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Syringocystadenoma papilliferum nevus sebaceous

Syringocystadenoma papilliferum arising in a naevus sebaceou

  1. Syringocystadenoma papilliferum (SCAP) have been reported to originate from naevus sebaceus. SCAP is a rare, benign adnexal skin tumour of apocrine or eccrine type of differentiation which t Naevus sebaceus is a cutaneous hamartoma with the potential of developing into benign or malignant neoplasms
  2. Syringocystadenoma papilliferum is a benign tumor most commonly located on the scalp or face, and it often arises within a nevus sebaceus of Jadassohn. We describe a 61-year-old man with syringocystadenoma papilliferum developing within a nevus sebaceus with sebaceous differentiation in an intradermal tubular apocrine component of the.
  3. Nevus sebaceus is a benign skin hamartoma of congenital onset that grows during puberty, and in adulthood can develop secondary benign and malignant neoplasms. The most common benign neoplasms occurring in nevus sebaceus are believed to be syringocystadenoma papilliferum, trichilemmoma, and trichoblastoma
  4. Syringocystadenoma papilliferum (SPAP) is an adnexal neoplasm that is typically present on the head or neck at birth and often enlarges at puberty

Naevus sebaceus is a cutaneous hamartoma with the potential of developing into benign or malignant neoplasms. Syringocystadenoma papilliferum (SCAP) have been reported to originate from naevus sebaceus. SCAP is a rare, benign adnexal skin tumour of apocrine or eccrine type of differentiation which typically presents as a nodule or a plaque on the scalp or face. We report a case of syringocystadenoma papilliferum arising in an undiagnosed pre-existing naevus sebaceus in a 56-year-old female The forehead lesion was a nevus sebaceous and the postauricular lesion was a syringocystadenoma papilliferum. Except for a few patients with widespread nevus sebaceous and syringocystadenoma papilliferum associated with neurologic abnormalities, most of the previously reported patients with these nevi have had solitary lesions of one or the other Syringocystadenoma papilliferum may occur de-novo or within a nevus sebaceous. It occasionally co-exists with other tumours such as basal cell carcinomas and verrucous carcinomas [ 3 ]. We are presenting a case which was clinically diagnosed as keratocanthoma of the scalp but was later histologically diagnosed as syringocystadenoma papilliferum sebaceous nevus of Jadassohn. Dermatology 1997; 195:155-8. Yamamoto O, Doi Y, Hamada T, et al. An immunohistochemical and ultrastructural study of syringocystadenoma papilliferum. Br J Dermatol 2002; 147:936-45. Katoulis AC, Bozi E. Syringocystadenoma papilliferum. Orphanet Encyclopedia. April 2004 A sebaceous naevus is an uncommon type of birthmark. Present at birth, it is most often found on the scalp, but sebaceous naevi may also arise on the face, neck or forehead. It consists of overgrown epidermis (upper layers of the skin), sebaceous glands, hair follicles, apocrine glands and connective tissue

Nevus sebaceous (NS) is a congenital hamartomatous disorder that commonly involves the scalp or face. The lesion usually presents as a linear, yellow, hairless, and verrucous plaque, characteristically evolves, and changes in morphology with time1,2 Syringocystadenoma papilliferum is another papillary apocrine tumor with a verrucous surface and multiple downward epidermal invaginations creating poral surface openings that transform in their depths into apocrine linings with a papillary architecture. From: Survey of Ophthalmology, 201 Syringocystadenoma papilliferum is a rare benign adnexal tumor that frequently shows apocrine differentiation. It usually develops on the scalp and is associated with a nevus sebaceus in 40% of cases. Although the clinical presentation may differ, its histology is characteristic Syringocystadenoma papilliferum (SCAP) and tubular apocrine adenoma (TAA) are rare, benign, sweat gland tumors. In some cases, TAAs can arise in association with SCAPs, and SCAPs are often situated in the superficial portion of TAAs1-11. In a few cases of TAAs associated with SCAPs, pre-existing sebaceous nevi have been described1-6,8,9

Syringocystadenoma papilliferum with sebaceous

  1. of excision as nevus sebaceus. Shortly thereafter, Dörffel1S reported a case of a scalp tumor which showed, histologically, combined syringocystadenoma papilli¬ ferum, nevus sebaceus, and epithelioma. He applied the diagnostic name of syringocystadenomatosus papilliferus et sebaceous et epitheliomatosus to it. COMMENT By themselves syringocystadenoma papilliferum and nevus sebaceus may, per
  2. The commonest benign neoplasms are syringocystadenoma papilliferum (SCAP) and trichoblastoma, whereas the commonest malignant one is basal cell carcinoma (BCC). The incidence of these tumors increases with age, in particular after puberty.Another significant association of sebaceous nevus is a neurocutaneous syndrome known as linear nevus.
  3. Nevus sebaceous (NS) is a clinically common benign tumor and has a high potential to develop into a great diversity of neoplasms of epidermal and adnexal origins. However, it is a rare phenomenon of the coexistence in a single NS with two or more skin tumors
  4. 14. Manomukul J, Omeapinyan P, Vongjirad A. Mucoepidermoid (Adenosquamous) carcinoma, trichoblastoma, trichilemmoma, sebaceous adenoma, tumor of follicular infundibulum and syringocystadenoma papilliferum arising within 2 persistent lesions of nevus sebaceous: report of a case. Am J Dermatopathol. 2009;31:658
  5. Syringocystadenoma papilliferum is a rare benign hamartomatous adnexal tumor. Fifty percent of the cases are reportedly present at birth while 15-30% are present during puberty. The tumor has varied clinical presentation. It presents as a hairless area on the scalp and is said to be associated with sebaceous nevus of Jadassohn
  6. Abstract. INTRODUCTION :Syringocystadenoma papilliferum (SCAP) is a relatively rare benign adnexal skin tumor which can manifest in a variety of clinical forms. Nearly one-third of cases are known to develop within a pre-existing nevus sebaceus (NS). The peculia

sebaceous nevus. Summary Syringocystadenoma papilliferum is uncommon. Its association with a nevus sebaceus makes the tumor not only interestingbut a rather rare finding. Attention is called to the significance of these two lesions occurring as a mixed tumor. Syringocyst¬ adenoma papilliferum arises from the anläge of the apocrine ducts, and. Basal cell carcinoma and syringocystadenoma papilliferum arising in nevus sebaceous on face-a rare entity Sunil Kumar Gupta 1 , Vivek Gupta 2 1 Department of Skin, V.D. and Leprosy, Hind Institute of Medical Sciences, Uttar Pradesh, India 2 Department of Pathology, Hind Institute of Medical Sciences, Safedabad, Barabanki, Uttar Pradesh, Indi Sebaceous carcinoma, basal cell carcinoma, trichoadenoma, trichoblastoma, and syringocystadenoma papilliferum arising within a nevus sebaceus This case report highlights the diverse neoplastic potential of nevus sebaceus and demonstrates the capacity of this hamartoma to develop aggressive tumors, such as sebaceous carcinoma

Syringocystadenoma Papilliferum of Skin is a rare condition in which a tumor occurs in the apocrine sweat glands. It is an uncommon tumor that occurs on the skin as a painless nodule. There are three different types of sweat glands in the skin. These include the apocrine sweat glands, the eccrine sweat glands, and the sebaceous sweat glands A 45‐year‐old woman presented with a nevus sebaceusthat contained five separate neoplasms, including sebaceous carcinoma, basal cell carcinoma, trichoadenoma, trichoblastoma, and syringocystadenoma papilliferum. Results. Complete excision of the nevus sebaceus and the five tumors was performed Nevus sebaceous of Jadassohn is a cutaneous hamartoma that is associated with various benign and malignant cutaneous tumors. Syringocystadenoma papilliferum and tubular apocrine adenoma are rare benign adnexal tumors We describe a rare case of sebaceous carcinoma arising in combination with sebaceoma, trichoblastoma, and syringocystadenoma papilliferum (SCAP) in the setting of NS. To our knowledge, only a total of 30 cases of sebaceous carcinoma arising in NS have been reported in the literature [2, 6, 7, 8, 9]

(Redirected from Syringadenoma papilliferum) Syringocystadenoma papilliferum is a benign apocrine tumor. It can arise with nevus sebaceus Nevus sebaceus, also called nevus sebaceus of Jadassohn or organoid nevus, is a benign hamartoma of the skin, characterized by hyperplasia of the epidermis, immature hair follicles, and sebaceous and apocrine glands. Lesions are usually present at birth and appear as waxy, yellow-orange or tan, hairless plaques ( picture 2C ) SYRINGOCYSTADENOMA papilliferum with nevus sebaceus combined in one lesion as a mixed tumor is interesting, not alone for its comparative rarity, but because its occurrence in the past has been the basis for the belief that these two histologically distinct structures are thereby histogenetically related and that their presence is the end-result of a dysontogenesis Syringocystadenoma papilliferum is a benign tumor most commonly located on the scalp or face, and it often arises within a nevus sebaceus of Jadassohn. We describe a 61-year-old man with syringocystadenoma papilliferum developing within a nevus sebaceus with sebaceous differentiation in an intradermal tubular apocrine component of the syringocystadenoma papilliferum

A patient with nevus sebaceus developed not only syringocystadenoma papilliferum but also prurigo nodularis within her hamartomatous lesion; multiple biopsies were necessary to establish the diagnoses. Excision of the residual nevus sebaceus also revealed an apocrine cystadenoma, basaloid follicular proliferation, and sebaceoma 2. Discussion. Syringocystadenoma papilliferum most commonly occurs in the head and neck region, either de novo or within a nevus sebaceus. In a review of the literature by Mammino and Vidmar in 1991, 145 cases from 18 different studies and case reports were evaluated. 6 Although 75% of lesions occurred on the head and neck, 20% occurred on the trunk, and only 5% occurred on the extremities benign tumors, nevus sebaceus being present in 40% of cases. 3,6 Syringocystadenoma papilliferum and tri-choblastoma are the most common tumors develo-ping in nevus sebaceus; however, others are also found: nodular hidradenoma, syringoma, sebaceous epithelioma, chondroid syringoma, trichilemmoma, trichoadenoma, sebaceous carcinoma, basal cell. Naevus Sebaceous; Apocrine Adenoma; Trichilemmoma; Desmoplastic Trichilemmoma; Basaloid Follicular Hamartoma; Syringocystadenoma Papilliferum Introduction Nevus Sebaceous of Jadassohn (SNJ) is a cutaneous hamartoma that has a well-documented potential to develop a variety of benign and, less commonly, malignant neoplasms of epidermal and. In addition, database queries were run for trichoblastoma, syringocystadenoma papilliferum, trichilemmoma, basal cell carcinoma (BCC), and apocrine adenoma. Cases exhibiting some features of nevus sebaceous but not unequivocally diagnostic were excluded. Demographic and clinical data along with reported secondary neoplasms were extracted from.

Nevus sebaceous (NS) is a congenital skin lesion commonly seen by pediatricians, dermatologists, and plastic surgeons. It occurs in fewer than 1% of neonates, and was first described by Jadassohn in 1895 ().Nevus sebaceous is a congenital hamartoma of the skin, defined by hyperplasia of the epidermis, hair follicles, and sebaceous and apocrine glands Herein, we describe a 63‐year‐old male with multiple tumors arising within a nevus sebaceus on the posterior scalp. On histopathologic examination, four distinct tumors were identified: trichoblastoma, syringocystadenoma papilliferum, desmoplastic trichilemmoma and tumor of the follicular infundibulum (TFI)

Syringocystadenoma Papilliferum Growth in a Nevus Sebaceou

  1. Syringocystadenoma papilliferum (SCAP) is a benign adnexal tumor, thought to arise from either pleuripotential appendageal cells or apo-eccrine glands 1, 2.It may occur de novo in children but frequently arises from a head or neck organoid nevus 3.It is rarely found on the trunk or limbs and occasionally coexists with other tumors
  2. Nevus sebaceous of Jadassohn is a cutaneous hamartoma that is associated with various benign and malignant cutaneous tumors. Syringocystadenoma papilliferum and tubular apocrine adenoma are rare benign adnexal tumors. Simultaneous occurrence of all three tumors at the same site is extremely rare, which has raised several questions regarding.
  3. Sebaceous nevus (SN) is a solitary, well-circumscribed, plaque-like raised lesion of epidermal origin. SN is commonly found on the scalp, temple, or the preauricular region and is sometimes diagnosed at birth. More recent evidence indicates that benign tumors such as trichoblastoma and syringocystadenoma papilliferum are more common and.
  4. Sebaceous carcinoma, basal cell carcinoma, trichoadenoma, trichoblastoma, and syringocystadenoma papilliferum arising within a nevus sebaceus. Miller CJ , Ioffreda MD , Billingsley EM Dermatol Surg , 30(12 pt 2):1546-1549, 01 Dec 200
  5. ous glands of the external auditory canal. This lesion frequently occurs as a secondary neoplasm within nevus sebaceous. Syringocystadenoma papilliferum belongs to the category of cutaneous apocrine adenoma.

Syringocystadenoma papilliferum (SCAP) is a rare skin adnexal neoplasm of apocrine gland. One-third of SCAP cases are associated with nevus of Jadassohn.... DOAJ is a community-curated online directory that indexes and provides access to high quality, open access, peer-reviewed journals The most frequent benign tumors are trichoblastomas and syringocystadenoma papilliferum, occurring in less than 5% of nevus sebaceus. [ 4 ] Other benign and malignant tumors include apocrine cystadenoma , leiomyoma and sebaceous cell carcinoma

Nevus Sebaceous and Syringocystadenoma Papilliferum JAMA

in nevus sebaceous syringocystadenoma papilliferum - What is seen on histology? acanthotic epidermis with cystic invaginations containing numerous villous projections lined by two layers of epithelial cells (columnar and small cuboidal), plasma cells in stroma, decapitation secretio

Dear Editor, Nevus sebaceous (NS) has a well‐documented potential to develop a wide variety of benign or malignant neoplasms of both epidermal and adnexal origins. It is, however, highly unusual for more than three tumors to arise simultaneously within a single nevus sebaceous. Herein, we report a case of sebaceoma, trichoblastoma and syringocystadenoma papilliferum arising from NS. A. Five sebaceous nevi carried 2 RAS mutations. Nonlesional tissue from 18 patients showed a wildtype HRAS sequence. Eight individuals developed secondary tumors within the nevus sebaceous, including 2 syringocystadenoma papilliferum, 3 trichoblastomas, and 3 trichilemmomas, and all secondary tumors carried the same mutation as the nevi Tumors may arise in nevus sebaceus over time; however, the majority of tumors are benign. The most common two benign tumors which develop are syringocystadenoma papilliferum and trichoblastoma

Syringocystadenoma Papilliferum of the Scalp in an Adult

Sebaceous naevus DermNet N

Nevus sebaceus or sebaceous nevus (the first term is its Latin name, the second term is its name in English; also known as an organoid nevus: 661 and nevus sebaceus of Jadassohn: 773) is a congenital, hairless plaque that typically occurs on the face or scalp. Such nevi are classified as epidermal nevi and can be present at birth, or early childhood, and affect males and females of all. What are the clinical features of a syringocystadenoma papilliferum (SPAP)? Benign apocrine neoplasm; presents at BIRTH OR EARLY CHILDHOOD with a SOLITARY, WARTY PAPULE/plaque on SCALP (> other sites on head/neck > trunk and extremities); usually associated with a nevus sebaceous Read Sebaceous Carcinoma, Basal Cell Carcinoma, Trichoadenoma, Trichoblastoma, and Syringocystadenoma Papilliferum Arising within a Nevus Sebaceus, Dermatologic Surgery on DeepDyve, the largest online rental service for scholarly research with thousands of academic publications available at your fingertips

Nevus Sebaceous Accompanying Secondary Neoplasms and

Nevus sebaceous of Jadassohn (SNJ) is a congenital, hamartoma of multiple skin structures and may classically evolve through several stages of maturation. Many neoplasms have been reported to arise in association with SNJ, most commonly trichoblastoma and syringocystadenoma papilliferum Warnke PH, Russo PA, Schimmelpenning GW, et al. Linear intraoral lesions in the sebaceous nevus syndrome. J Am Acad Dermatol . 2005 Feb. 52(2 Suppl 1):62-4. [Medline] The most frequent benign tumors are trichoblastomas and syringocystadenoma papilliferum, occurring in less than 5% of nevus sebaceus. Russo PA, Schimmelpenning GW, et al. Linear intraoral. Nevus sebaceous (NS) is a congenital hamartomatous disorder that commonly involves the scalp or face. The lesion usually presents as a linear, yellow, hairless, and verrucous plaque, characteristically evolves, and changes in morphology with time 1, 2.It has been well-established that various types of appendageal tumors develop secondarily within lesions of NS n an intradermal tubular apocrine component of the syringocystadenoma papilliferum. Although some adnexal neoplasms that develop in association with a nevus sebaceus may exhibit conjoint sebaceous, follicular, or apocrine differentiation, reflecting close embryological relations of the folliculosebaceous-apocrine unit, the feature we report on has not previously been described to the best of.

Basal cell carcinoma and syringocystadenoma papilliferum

Syringocystadenoma Papilliferum - an overview

Comments: Syringocystadenoma papilliferum arising in association with a nevus sebaceus (see previous image). The tumor consists of a number of villous and papillary processes lined by a double layer of epithelium.There is an outer layer of tall columnar cells with eosinophilic cytoplasm and an inner layer of small cuboidal myoepithelial cells with hyperchromatic nuclei (best seen in image 20) A case of syringocystadenoma papilliferum in nevus sebaceus mimicking squamous cell carcinoma in a Filipino female treated with CO2 laser excision was presented. It is essential to be mindful of the various presentations of syringocystadenoma papilliferum because atypical forms can mimic malignancy Syringocystadenoma Papilliferum is a benign sweat gland neoplasm that usually arises in a Nevus Sebaceous on the scalp and I only occasionally encounter this skin lesion in both my The Woodlands dermatology and Conroe dermatology clinics. Approximately, 50% of Syringocystadenoma Papilliferum lesions are present at birth and the rest arise later.

Dermoscopic aspects of syringocystadenoma papilliferum

Syringocystadenoma Papilliferum of the Back Combined with

Syringocystadenoma papilliferum developed on sebaceous

Syringocystadenoma papilliferum and tubular apocrine adenoma are rare benign sweat gland tumors. Syringocystadenoma papilliferum occurs alone or in association with other tumors. Although it is rare, the association of tubular apocrine adenoma with syringocystadenoma papilliferum developing in a sebaceous nevus on the scalp is well documented nevus sebaceus, sebaceous carcinoma, sebaceoma, skin adnexal tumor, intraductal hyperplasia, syringocystadenocarcinoma papilliferum, mucinous metaplasia Search for Similar Articles You may search for similar articles that contain these same keywords or you may modify the keyword list to augment your search 1. Introduction. Sebaceous Nevus of Jadassohn (SN) is a congenital skin hamartoma of the cutaneous structures that typically occurs within the head and neck region. SN is usually apparent at birth as a hairless plaque, and becomes more yellowish and cerebriform at puberty .In the adulthood, a possible secondary intralesional neoplasm, benign or more rarely malignant, can develop in about the. squamous cell carcinoma, sebaceous carcinoma, syringocystadenoma papilliferum, apocrine carcinoma, trichilemmoma and mucoepidermoid carcinoma [1,4-6]. We report a case of SNJ with multiple and unusual neoplastic components. Case History and Pathology A 59 year old woman had a long standing lesion, clinically diagnosed as a naevus sebaceous Syringocystadenoma Papilliferum of the Back Combined with a Tubular Apocrine Adenoma Hyun Joo Lee, M.D., Eujin Cho, M.D., Min Ho we concluded that our case was a SCAP combined with a TAA because there was no evidence of a pre-existing sebaceous nevus in the completely excised specimen. The intradermal tubular component may be a part of SCAP.

Nevus Sebaceus 2

Syringocystadenoma papilliferum and trichoblastoma arising

Herein, we describe a 63‐year‐old male with multiple tumors arising within a nevus sebaceus on the posterior scalp. On histopathologic examination, four distinct tumors were identified: trichoblastoma, syringocystadenoma papilliferum, desmoplastic trichilemmoma and tumor of the follicular infundibulum (TFI). Within the TFI component of the nevus sebaceus, there was intracytoplasmic. Syringocystadenoma papilliferum usually presents as a solitary papule, nodule, or plaque on the scalp, and, in many cases, the lesion is associated with a nevus of Jadassohn. Histopathologically, the lesion appears as a crateriform lesion, composed of one or several dilated and confluent hair follicle infundibula connected with numerous. Read Basal Cell Carcinoma, Syringocystadenoma Papilliferum, Trichilemmoma, and Sebaceoma Arising Within a Nevus Sebaceus Associated with Pigmented Nevi, Dermatologic Surgery on DeepDyve, the largest online rental service for scholarly research with thousands of academic publications available at your fingertips 8-10 Therefore, up to the present time little is known on dermoscopy in cases of syringocystadenoma papilliferum and nevus sebaceus. Dermoscopy of a nevus sebaceus shows roundshaped structures of a yellowish-white color, grouped together or presenting singly, which may correspond to clusters of mature, superficial sebaceous glands Syringocystadenoma papilliferum is a rare, benign tumor, most common in the scalp and face. It can present as an independent lesion or be associated with nevus sebaceous of Jadassohn. Rare cases of this tumor located in the thigh have been reported in the literature. The present article reports the case of a patient with syringocystadenoma.

Nevus sebaceous (NS) is a benign tumor with the potential to develop secondary benign and malignant neoplasms. It is a rare phenomenon to develop 2 or more skin tumors in a single NS lesion. We report a case of multiple secondary tumors, such as sebaceoma, sebaceous carcinoma, syringocystadenoma papilliferum, and trichoblastoma, in a single NS lesion One patient with it developed basal cell carcinoma, syringocystadenoma papilliferum, and trichilemmoma within the nevus sebaceous. In a study of one affected family, phacomatosis pigmentokeratotica was found to be caused by a postzygotic HRAS mutation in a multipotent progenitor cell Nevus sebaceous is a congenital epidermal lesion that typically presents in infancy from the neck up and rarely undergoes malignant transformation. In patients who do present with malignancy, both RAS oncogene and PTCH tumor suppressor gene mutations have been implicated. We report an unusual case of nevus sebaceous in a 41-year-old male patient that developed into basal cell carcinoma on the. Development of syringocystadenoma papilliferum in lesions of naevus sebaceous is seen in 8-19% cases. This is clinically suggetsed by rapid growth of the lesion with increased nodularity of its surface. A diligent search of the excised lesion from our patient failed to reveal any areas histopathologically resembling syringocystadenoma paplliferum Syringocystadenoma papilliferum (SCAP) is an uncommon benign hamartomatous adnexal tumor. It arises from pluripotential cells and histology exhibits apocrin

Focused Sebaceous Proliferations and Tumors with stained slides of pathology. Follow us: Nevus Sebaceus & Syringocystadenoma Papilliferum. Nevus Sebaceus & Syringocystadenoma Papilliferum. Nevus Sebaceus & Syringocystadenoma Papilliferum. Sebaceous Adenoma Nevus Sebaceous appears as a yellow/orange raised smooth or verrucous plaque that causes alopecia if it is on a hair bearing area. Other tumors can arise in a Nevus Sebaceous with trichoblastomas and syringocystadenoma papilliferum being the most common. In 1% of all Nevus Sebaceous, a Basal Cell Cancer may arise and the risk of tumor. Syringocystadenoma papilliferum (also known as Syringadenoma papilliferum) is an apocrine tumor. It can arise with nevus sebaceous. See also. List of cutaneous conditions; Hidradenoma papilliferum; Papillary eccrine adenoma; List of cutaneous conditions associated with increased risk of nonmelanoma skin cancer; Reference Syringocystadenoma papilliferum (SCAP) occurs singly or in association with other tumors. Although it is rare, the association of tubular apocrine adenoma (TAA) with SCAP in the background of nevus sebaceous (NS) on the scalp is well documented These include syringocystadenoma papilliferum, trichoblastoma, tricholemmoma, sebaceoma, nevocellular nevus, and seborrheic keratosis. The most common malignancy that develops within a nevus sebaceous is a basal cell carcinoma, but the absolute incidence is very rare

syringocystadenoma papilliferum A benign skin-adnexal tumour or hamartoma with eccrine/apocrine differentiation, which most often occurs on the scalp, face and neck and less commonly in the limbs and chest; ± associated with naevus sebaceus Nevus Sebaceous of Jadassohn (NSJ) is defined as a hamartoma composed predominantly of sebaceous glands, which can progress to benign as well as malignant tumors. trichilemmoma and syringocystadenoma papilliferum [3,4]. NSJ is generally accompagned by focal alopecia, but without underlying ulceration or pigmentation

Cerebriform Nevus Sebaceous of JadassohnSebaceous nevus

Syringocystadenoma papilliferum (SCAP) is a rare, benign, adnexal neoplasm that typically presents as a single, red to brown plaque. The lesion may have ulcerations, crusting, and serous drainage or a wart-like appearance. Differential diagnosis of SCAP may include sebaceous nevus, epidermal nevus, or aplasia cutis congenita

Virtual Grand Rounds in Dermatology(PDF) Linear syringocystadenoma papilliferum on female

- Nevus sebaceous - Nevus sebaceous dark skin - Nevus sebaceous adolescent - Syringocystadenoma papilliferum - Alopecia mucinosa on scalp - Alopecia mucinosa - Cutaneous B cell lymphoma - Pilar cyst - Pilar cyst 3 - Acne keloidalis nuchae on posterior scalp - Acne keloidalis nuchae - end stage - Acne keloidalis nuchae - keloidal papules and plaque Nevus sebaceous (NS) is a common congenital hamartoma which presents as a well-demarcated skin-colored to yellowish alopecic patch. Numerous secondary tumors can arise within NS, including trichoblastoma, syringocystadenoma papilliferum (SCAP), trichilemmoma, and such malignant tumors as squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) 1 Nevus sebaceus or sebaceous nevus (the first term is its Latin name, the second term is its name in English; also known as an organoid nevus:661 and nevus sebaceus of Jadassohn:773) is a congenital, hairless plaque that typically occurs on the face or scalp. Syringocystadenoma papilliferum is a benign apocrine tumor Basal cell carcinoma, syringocystadenoma papilliferum, trichilemmoma, and sebaceoma arising within a nevus sebaceus associated with pigmented nevi. Dermatol Surg. 2011; 37(12):1806-10 (ISSN: 1524-4725